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Post-grad depression: How to deal with it

Post-grad depression: How to deal with it

From kindergarten through college, school is one of the main constants in a young adult’s life. Even though exams, projects and homework can be overwhelming and stressful for students, attending school provides a structure and potential support system that some people may not realize they depend on. And once graduation time hits, it can be intimidating to enter the “real world.” With stressors such as debt, job searching and social media expectations surrounding post-graduation, the transition can be challenging and can lead to feelings of anxiety and depression. Fortunately, every step along the way can be taken in stride – if equipped with the correct mindset.

Below are a few tips and words of encouragement to help conquer the battle that post-grad depression brings.

Recognize the risks of social media

Social media creates the facade that everyone is living the perfect life, which produces feelings of envy and anxiety in most young adults. Comparing yourself to others online can be damaging to your mental health. Know that social media only shows the highlight reels, and the hard times simply aren’t shared. Try giving your friends on social media a call instead. You may learn that they are experiencing similar problems, …

Helping teens care about mental health

Helping teens care about mental health

Every teenager is going to experience pressure at some point in his life – pressure to achieve academically, pressure to fit in, pressure to establish a career path, etc. With the increasing demands put on teens today, it’s essential for them to understand the importance of mental wellness. Developing self-confidence through mental wellness will make it easier on teens to resist peer pressure.

Mental health is just as important as physical health, and it’s crucial for teens to appreciate its role in wellness as they prepare to venture into the world on their own. Below, we offer a few tips on how to encourage your teen to prioritize mental health.

Teach coping skills

Learning how to deal with and conquer negative emotions takes time. Work with your child to establish healthy coping skills that will ease the stress of the daily struggles he faces. Coping techniques can be different for every teenager, so work together to find what works. The goal is to establish a habit that will help your child put his negative feelings into perspective, allowing him to seek a healthy solution. 

Be open to having hard conversations

It’s no secret that talking with teenagers about controversial subjects …

Sleep and your child’s mental health

Sleep and your child’s mental health

It’s no secret – sleep is an essential factor when it comes to your child’s overall health and development. While a few bad nights can be normal, children with persistent sleeping problems could lead to temperament, learning and social behavior issues. Below, we outline steps you can take to improve your child’s sleeping habits, ensuring they get the critical sleep they need to develop and function properly.

Bedtime bravery

For a lot of children, the looming thought of going to sleep can be anxiety-inducing. That’s why it’s important to help them face it with bravery. Try drowning out odd noises with a sound machine; illuminating the room with a night light; or re-labeling an air freshener bottle as “monster spray.” Stay consistent in helping them face their fear. If they wake up in the middle of the night, bring them back to their own bed – instead of resorting to letting them sleep in yours. In turn, celebrate your child’s good nights by using a rewards system such as a sticker chart.

Sleep environment control

Allow your child to take control of his or her bedtime routine by choosing which stuffed friend or blanket to bring to bed. Find an …

Beat the college stressors: Back to school for college students

Beat the college stressors: Back to school for college students

Whether you’re a college freshman who’s independent for the first time or a college senior who’s tasked with landing a job upon graduation, students of all ages deal with a lot of change, which can often be stressful and scary.

It’s true that your college years can be some of the best years of your life. But, we won’t sugar coat it – life in college can definitely be hectic, demanding and intimidating for some. The good news is you’re not the only one feeling this way. Experiencing anxiety over major life changes is normal. Some levels of stress can actually be a good thing, as the right kind of stress can lead us toward positive change and growth. However, stress and anxiety become a problem and a health risk for students when they exist for an extended period of time and seem impossible to control.

Whether it’s social or academic pressures, it’s important to seek resolutions from healthy outlets instead of harmful ones – such as drugs and alcohol. There are several resources available on campus to help you cope with and manage student stress. If you feel you need further guidance and support, these resources can connect you …

Cell phones and your teen’s mental health

Cell phones and your teen’s mental health

We live in a time where everything is easily accessible via our fingertips. Cell phones are an extremely useful invention, allowing us to stay connected with friends and family and up to date on the latest news and trends.

However, this rise in technology has caused new forms of addiction, as the need for acceptance seems to be more important than ever. Teens are under an increasing amount of social pressure, and the Internet and social media have amplified these pressures, leading to increased anxiety and depression in teens. Below, we outline steps you can take to protect your child’s mental and physical health and make digital media a more balanced part of his or her life.

Facilitate face time

Technology can connect and isolate at the same time. Texting and communicating via social platforms are forms of faceless communication. From a young age, it’s essential to teach your child the importance of confronting his or her issues with others in person, rather than behind a cell phone or computer screen.

Instill self-esteem

Social media only shows the highlights of life. It’s easy for teens to compare themselves to others because of this. Let your child know that his or …